01. Efficient Cursor Movements

Let's learn some shortcuts for quick navigation around the command line.

Type the following sentence out into your command line for practice.

$ hello I am a testing monkey

Moving to the beginning and end of line

We can use the ctrl-key (^) to move our cursor:

^a
To beginning of the line (bol).
^e
To end of line (eol).

Moving a character or word at a time

We can move through either a character or a word at a time.

^f
Forward one character.
^b
Backward one character.
alt+f
Move cursor forward one word.
alt+b
Move cursor backward one word.

Transposing letters or words

Sometimes when we type really fast, we switch letters or words around.

We can fix this with transpose:

^t
Switches the character with the one next to it.
alt+t
transpose the word at the cursor location with the one preceding it.

Try it with these examples here:

$ java helloWordl
$ ls directoryName -l

Changing casing

To convert to lower or uppercase:

alt+l
Convert characters from cursor to end of the word to lowercase.
alt+u
Same as above, but to uppercase.

Deleting characters or words

To delete (or kill) characters or words, use the following:

^d
Delete the character at the cursor location.
^k
Kill the text from the cursor location to eol.
^u
Kill text from the cursor location to bol.
alt+d
Kill text from the cursor location to the end of the current word.

Clearing the terminal window

If the terminal window seems cluttered and we'd like to clear everything, we type:

$ clear 

Or to be more efficient, just hit ^l.

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