03. Using SSH Agent to Automate Login ssh-agent, ssh-add

The ssh-agent program is a daemon (a process that runs in the background) which stores your passphrases in memory, allowing you to easily access remote servers without typing a passphrase each time.

For our case, we have already created SSH keypairs with ssh-keygen and used ssh-copy-id to upload our private keys onto the authorized_keys file on our server. The only problem now is that we must input our passphrase upon every connection. Let's see how ssh-agent can help automate this task.

Running the SSH Agent and adding keys

To start the ssh-agent, input the command followed by bash.

$ ssh-agent bash

This will spawn a new bash process, in which ssh-agent runs in the background and stores the keys in memory. Now we can add our actual keys with ssh-add.

$ ssh-add
Enter passphrase for /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa: Identity added: /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa (/home/user/.ssh/id_rsa)

If your key is not in the canonical ~/.ssh directory, or has a different filename, type its path directly after the ssh-add command (e.g. ssh-add /path/to/file)

Congratulations! Now your passphrase has been added to the ssh-agent, and you will no longer need to input the passphrase. Now try logging into your server.

$ ssh user@54.201.157.251
Last login: Mon Dec 21 05:19:49 2015 from 104.36.30.122 [user@54.201.157.251 ~]$

Remember that once you exit out of the bash terminal spawned with ssh-agent, your passphrases will be lost and you'll have to run ssh-agent and ssh-add again.

Checking if SSH agent is running

Sometimes you'll need to check whether the ssh-agent is running or not. We can do so by checking our processes.

$ ps aux | grep ssh-agent
user      2411  0.0  0.0  10616   524 ?        Ss   05:35   0:00 ssh-agent bash

Listing all keys added

To view the keys that have been successfully added to the ssh-agent, use the -l option.

$ ssh-add -l
2048 ec:39:69:3d:c4:8b:63:fd:57:a3:78:51:6d:cd:cd:46 /home/user/.ssh/id_rsa (RSA)

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